Tests and Procedures


Click on the procedure/ test you are interesting in to read more:

Echocardiogram (Echo)

An Echo is similar to a fetal ultrasound used during pregnancy. An echo probe with gel is gently moved across the chest using sound waves to view the heart. This test allows us to learn valuable information about the size, structure, and function of your heart.

Before the test:

  • Plan to spend about one hour for preparation and the imaging portion.
  • Wear comfortable clothing since you will be laying on an exam table, while the sonographer obtains your images.
  • There are no dietary restrictions for this test.
  • Bring an updated list of your medication or the bottles with you to the test, so we may obtain an accurate list.
During the test:
  • You will be asked to lie on an examination table. To improve the quality of the pictures, a colorless gel is applied to the area of the chest where the transducer will be placed.
  • We will apply several stickers to your chest, so we can record the electrical activity of your heart.
  • The sonographer moves the transducer to various places over the left side of your chest and records your heart while performing important measurements.
After the test:
  • A written report will be sent to your referring physician.
  • Information gained from this test helps your doctor make an accurate diagnosis and develop a treatment plan that is best for you.

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Transesophageal Echocardiogram (TEE)

A TEE is an ultrasound of the heart. It uses sound waves to create an image of your heart and measure it's activity. After local numbing and sedations, a trained cardiologist will pass a flexible tube through the mouth and into the esophagus to obtain the profile of your heart. This gives clearer pictures of the values, muscle, and structures of the heart.


Before the test
  • If done as an outpatient we advise you have someone drive you to the hospital and take you home. You may receive sedation.
  • Do not eat for six hours before the test
  • If you accidently eat, please notify the lab, as your test may need to be rescheduled.
  • Notify your doctor if you have any known swallowing problems
  • You will be asked to sign a consent form after the test has been explained to you.
During the test
  • Stickers will be attached to your chest to monitor your heart.
  • The oxygen in your blood will be monitored using a monitoring device attached to a finger.
  • An intravenous (IV) line will be started so that medications can be given to you.
  • You will be asked to lie on your left side.
  • A "numbing medicine" will be sprayed into the back of your throat.
  • Medications to induce drowsiness will be given through an IV line.
  • Once sedated, a tube will be passed down the throat into the esophagus.
  • Pictures are then taken of the heart.
  • The test lasts approximately 15 minutes.
After the test
  • You begin to wake up shortly after scope is removed.
  • Once the throat is no longer numb, liquids and food will be introduced
  • You are observed until the doctor finds you are stable to return to your hospital room or leave the hospital.
  • The information provided by the procedure helps direct your treatment plan.

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Electrocardiogram (EKG/ECG)

An EKG is a graphic recording of the electrical impulses of the heart. These impulses are recorded on the surface of the body by electrodes. The EKG can help detect various diseases of the heart. The EKG is painless, harmless, and takes only a few minutes to perform.


Before the test:
  • There are no dietary restrictions prior to this test.
  • Bring an updated list of your medication or the bottles with you to the test, so we may obtain an accurate list.
  • Do not wear a one-piece jumpsuit, as you will be asked to undress from the waist up. Women will be provided a half gown, or cape to wear.
During the test:
  • A trained medical assistant will place several electrodes (small stickers) on your chest. Men may need to have small areas of their chest shaved, to ensure that the electrodes stay in place.
  • The electrodes are connected by wires to the machine that prints out the EKG.
After the test:
  • The physician can give you a complete interpretation.
  • If the test is abnormal or inconclusive, you doctor may order additional tests. The EKG will assist in your care plan.

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Holter Monitoring

A Holter Monitor is a continuous recording of your ECG (electrical heart activity), usually for 24 hours, while you go about your usual daily activities. The Holter monitor itself is a small, portable cassette recorder, worn on a strap over the shoulder. Several electrodes (small stickers) are placed on your chest and connected by wires to the recorder. This helps diagnose abnormal heart rhythms that may be silent or cause symptoms such as dizziness, fainting, and palpitations. It also helps evaluate the effectiveness of treatments, such as medications and pacemakers.


Before the test:
  • Wear a loose fitting blouse or shirt, with the buttons in the front.
  • Do not use lotions or bath oil on your skin. This will prevent the electrodes from sticking on your skin for 24 hours.
  • There are no dietary restrictions.
  • Take your medication as prescribed, unless instructed otherwise.
During the test:
  • Several areas on your chest will be cleansed with alcohol and an abrasive pad, to ensure good electrode contact. Men may need to have areas of their chest shaved.
  • Please inform the medical assistant or nurse if you are allergic to cloth or paper tape. This will be used to help secure the electrodes on your skin.
  • The electrodes are connected to the recorder.
  • We encourage you to do anything you would normally do, except activities that would get the electrodes, wires, or recorder wet (shower, bath).
  • The nurse will show you a button on the recorder to press if you have a symptom. This will mark the tracing for the doctor and help correlate your symptoms with your ECG tracing.
  • Try to sleep on your back, with the recorder positioned at your side so that the electrodes are not pulled off.
  • You will keep a notepad to log in your activities, any symptoms you experience, and the time at which the symptoms occurred. This log book is very important, as it will enable the doctor to correlate your activities and symptoms with the ECG tracing.
  • DON'T FORGET TO BRING THE LOG BOOK BACK WHEN YOU RETURN THE RECORDER!
After the test:
  • Once you return the monitor, the cassette is analyzed. The report is printed for your doctor to review.
  • The information gained will help us make an accurate diagnosis and develop a treatment plan for you.
  • A full report will be sent to your referring physician.

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Carotid Ultrasound

A carotid ultrasound is a test that uses sound waves to create an image of your carotid artery (main blood vessel to the brain). This allows us to measure the blood flow through that artery and assess for any possible narrowing. An ultrasound probe with colorless gel is placed over the neck, which give us the necessary information to make an evaluation.


Before the test:
  • There are no special preparations for this test.
  • Plan to spend about one hour for preparation and the imaging portion.
During the test:
  • You will lie on a bed in an exam room for the test.
  • The Vascular lab technician will review your chart.
  • A water based gel is used to improve the picture quality.
  • The sound waves then produce images on a monitor.
  • The technician may be talking into the machine while taking the pictures.
  • You may hear your heart beat and/or a whooshing sound as your blood flows.
After the test:
  • Written report will be sent to your referring physician.
  • Information gained from this test helps your doctor make an accurate diagnosis and tailor a treatment plan that is best for you.

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Abdominal Aorta Ultrasound

An Abdominal Aorta Ultrasound is a test that uses sound waves to create an image of your abdominal aorta (main blood vessel of your body). This allows us to measure the blood flow through that artery and assess for any possible narrowing or dilatation. Progression of these findings could lead to severe symptoms or death and treatment could change the course of the disease.


Before the test:
  • There are no special preparations for this test.
  • Plan to spend about one hour for preparation and the imaging portion.
During the test:
  • You will lie on a bed in an exam room for the test.
  • The Vascular lab technician will review your chart.
  • A water based gel is used to improve the picture quality.
  • The sound waves then produce images on a monitor.
  • The technician may be talking into the machine while taking the pictures.
  • You may hear your heart beat and/or a whooshing sound as your blood flows.
After the test:
  • A written report will be sent to your referring physician.
  • Information gained from this test helps your doctor make an accurate diagnosis and tailor a treatment plan that is best for you.

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Lower Extremity Doppler Ultrasound Test

A Lower Extremity Doppler Ultrasound is a test that uses sound waves to create an image of the blood vessels of your thighs and legs at multiple levels. This allows us to measure the blood flow through that artery and assess for any possible narrowing. Progression of these findings could lead to severe symptoms such as leg pain or abnormal blood flow.


Before the test:
  • There are no special preparations for this test.
  • Plan to spend about one hour for preparation and the imaging portion.
During the test:
  • You will lie on a bed in an exam room for the test.
  • The Vascular lab technician will review your chart.
  • A water based gel is used to improve the picture quality.
  • The sound waves then produce images on a monitor.
  • The technician may be talking into the machine while taking the pictures.
  • You may hear a whooshing sound as your blood flows.
After the test:
  • A written report will be sent to your referring physician.
  • Information gained from this test helps your doctor make an accurate diagnosis and tailor a treatment plan that is best for you.

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Exercise Stress EKG Test

An Exercise Stress EKG test typically involves the patient walking on a treadmill while attached to an electrocardiogram (EKG) and blood pressure monitor. The exercise speed adjusts to a protocol. The doctor and computer, at your side, measure your ability to exercise, the electrical activity of your heart, and your blood pressure response to exercise. This test can help detect heart and blood vessel problems that may not be apparent at rest.


Before the test:
  • You should plan to be at the office for one hour, which includes preparation for the test, the exercise portion, and the recovery period.
  • Wear or bring comfortable attire and walking/running shoes.
  • Do not eat for at least two hours before the test. Make your last meal light and without tea, coffee or alcohol.
  • Continue your currently heart medications unless specified otherwise.
  • You will be given an explanation of the test and asked to sign a consent prior to the test.
  • Several areas on your chest and shoulders will be cleansed with alcohol and stickers will be placed on your chest. Men may need to have areas of their chest shaved, to ensure that the stickers stay in place.

During the test:
  • You will walk on the treadmill.
  • The doctor will ask you to communicate if any symptoms arise during the exercise and will instruct you throughout the test.
After the test:
  • You will be monitored for another 5 to 10 minutes while you recover from the exercise portion of the test.
  • The electrodes will be removed from your chest.
  • The doctor conducting the test can give you preliminary results before you leave. A complete interpretation will be sent to your referring physician.
  • If the test is abnormal or inconclusive, then additional tests may be ordered.
  • Information gained from this test helps your doctor make an accurate diagnosis and tailor a treatment plan that is best for you.

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Exercise Stress Echo Test

An Exercise Stress Echo test (also known as a stress echo) typically involves the patient walking on a treadmill while attached to an electrocardiogram (EKG) and blood pressure monitor. This test adds ultrasound imaging to study the heart before and after exercise. The doctor measures your ability to exercise on the treadmill, the electrical activity of your heart, and your blood pressure response. This test can help detect heart and blood vessel problems that may not be apparent at rest.


Before the test:
  • You should plan to be at the office for up to an hour and a half, which includes preparation for the test, the exercise portion, and the recovery period.
  • Wear or bring comfortable attire and walking/running shoes.
  • Do not eat for at least two hours before the test. Make your last meal light and without tea, coffee or alcohol.
  • Continue your currently heart medications unless specified otherwise.
  • You will be given an explanation of the test and asked to sign a consent prior to the test.
  • Several areas on your chest and shoulders will be cleansed with alcohol and stickers will be placed on your chest. Men may need to have areas of their chest shaved, to ensure that the stickers stay in place.

During the test:

  • The test is divided into three parts:
    • 1st: An echocardiogram will be performed at rest
    • 2nd: You will walk on a treadmill
    • 3rd: Another echocardiogram is performed while your heart is still beating rapidly immediately after exercise.
  • Resting echocardiogram - You will be asked to lie on an exam table. An ultrasound transducer with a colorless gel will be applied to the chest that creates the image of your heart on the screen.
  • Exercise test - You will walk on the treadmill. The doctor will ask you to communicate if any symptoms arise during the exercise and will instruct you throughout the test. The doctor will stop the test when you reach your peak heart rate, when you get too tired, or have significant symptoms.
  • After exercise – You will immediately return to the examining table, and lie in the same position (on your left side) as the first pictures. The sonographer will then record a second set of images while your heart is still beating rapidly.
After the test:
  • You will be monitored for another 5 minutes while you recover from the exercise portion of the test.
  • The electrodes will be removed from your chest.
  • The doctor conducting the test can give you preliminary results before you leave. A complete interpretation will be sent to your referring physician.
  • If the test is abnormal or inconclusive, then additional tests may be ordered.
  • Information gained from this test helps your doctor make an accurate diagnosis and tailor a treatment plan that is best for you.

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Dobutamine Stress Echo Test

A Dobutamine Stress Echo test is a test of the heart using the medicine dobutamine or atropine to make it beat faster and harder. This test adds ultrasound imaging to study the heart before, during and after the medication is given. The doctor measures the electrical activity of your heart, your blood pressure, and how well your heart is pumping with the medication. This test can help detect heart and blood vessel problems that may not be apparent at rest.


Before the test:
  • You should plan to be at the office for up to an hour and a half, which includes preparation for the test, the exercise portion, and the recovery period.
  • Wear or bring comfortable attire.
  • Do not eat for at least three hours before the test. Make your last meal light and without tea, coffee or alcohol. Avoid tobacco for three hours before the test.
  • Continue your currently heart medications unless specified otherwise.
  • You will be asked to sign a consent form after the test has been explained to you.
  • Several areas on your chest and shoulders will be cleansed with alcohol and stickers will be placed on your chest. Men may need to have areas of their chest shaved, to ensure that the stickers stay in place.
  • Bring a list of your medications or the prescription bottles with you.
  • Avoid using body lotion on your chest the day of the test.
During the test:
  • You will need to undress from the waist up; women will be given a patient gown or blanket with which to cover.
  • A staff member will place electrodes on your chest to monitor your heart rate. The skin may need to be cleaned, men may need to have chest hair shaved in order to obtain clear test results.
  • Blood pressure cuffs will be monitoring during the test.
  • A small intravenous catheter (IV catheter) will be placed in your hand or arm, through which the medicine dobutamine or atropine will be given during the test.
  • The test is divided into three parts:
    • 1st: An echocardiogram will take pictures of your heart by placing an ultrasound transducer on your chest. You will lie on your left side for these images.
    • 2nd: You will be given the medication dobutamine or atropine to speed up your heart rate. These medications may give short-lived symptoms that you should communicate to your doctor.
    • 3rd: Another echocardiogram is performed while your heart is still beating rapidly.
  • This study usually takes only 15 - 20 minutes; your heart rate and blood pressure is expected to gradually return to normal after the medication is stopped. You will be monitored during this time.
After the test:
  • You will be monitored for another 5 minutes.
  • The electrodes will be removed from your chest.
  • The IV catheter will be removed from your arm. Light pressure will be applied to the site to avoid bleeding. Please tell the nurse if you are on any medications that keep your blood from clotting.
  • The doctor conducting the test can give you preliminary results before you leave. A complete interpretation will be sent to your referring physician.
  • If the test is abnormal or inconclusive, then additional tests may be ordered.
  • Information gained from this test helps your doctor make an accurate diagnosis and tailor a treatment plan that is best for you.
  • You may feel tired after the test. You should avoid heavy exercise or physical work for the reminder of the day. If you have any symptoms or discomfort after you have left, you should contact your doctor immediately.

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Nuclear Stress Test (Thallium, Technetium)

A Nuclear Stress test is a test that uses a radioactive substance tracer (Thallium or Technetium) to produce pictures of the heart muscle. This method of imaging the heart is combined with exercise or a medication that stresses the heart. This helps us evaluate if the heart is getting adequate blood at rest and with exercise. The doctor measures the electrical activity of your heart, your blood pressure, and how well your heart is pumping with the medication. This test can detect heart and blood vessel problems that may not be apparent at rest. The doctor will decide if exercise or medication is better for your test.


Before the test:
  • IF YOU ARE NURSING OR IF YOU THINK YOU MAY BE PREGNANT, INFORM THE DOCTOR OR NUCLEAR TECH BEFORE THE TEST.
  • You should plan to be at the office for up to four hours, which includes preparation for the test, the exercise portion, and the recovery period. If you are scheduled for a 2-day test, plan to be at the office for two hours.
  • Please arrive at least 15 minutes ahead of your scheduled appointment time. If you are not on time we may need to reschedule.
  • We ask that you please notify us at least 24 hours prior to your appointment if you need to cancel your appointment.
  • If you have asthma or any respiratory condition, please notify us of this condition when we make your appointment and bring your inhaler with you.
  • An instruction sheet about the tracer will be provided for you. Feel free to direct questions to the nuclear tech or doctor.
  • Do not eat for at least three hours before the test. Make your last meal light. Absolutely no tea, coffee, soda, or chocolate for eight hours prior to the test.
  • If you are diabetic, please adjust your insulin or oral medication to your dietary intake.
  • Bring a list of your medications or the prescription bottles with you.
  • Wear or bring comfortable attire and walking/running shoes.
  • You will be asked to sign a consent form after the test has been explained to you.
During the test:
  • The test has three parts:
    • The rest pictures of your heart
    • The exercise or medication portion
    • The pictures of your heart after exercise or medication
  • Stickers will be placed on your chest to record the electrical activity of your heart and a blood pressure cuff will be placed on your arm.
  • An intravenous (IV) line will be started in a vein in your arm for the injection of the radioactive tracer and possible medication.
  • You will lie flat on a special table under a camera. Several pictures of the heart will be taken at various angles. You should remain still while the pictures are being taken. This part can take up to 20 minutes.
  • You will then walk on the treadmill or a medication will be injected into your IV line while you are monitored.
  • The doctor will ask you to communicate if any symptoms arise during the exercise and will instruct you throughout the test.
  • Try to exercise for as long as you are able to, as this provides us with more information.
  • If you are exercising, you should tell us when you are approaching your maximum ability to exercise. This will prompt the technician to inject the radiotracer into your IV line. You will be asked to continue to exercise for another minute or so after the injection.
  • After exercise, you will be asked to return in approximately one hour to have one more set of pictures. The technician will instruct you on what you can eat. The two image sets are compared to evaluate your heart.
After the test:
  • The electrodes will be removed from your chest.
  • The IV catheter will be removed from your arm. Light pressure will be applied to the site to avoid bleeding. Please tell the nurse if you are on any medications that keep your blood from clotting.
  • The doctor conducting the test can give you preliminary results before you leave. A complete interpretation will be sent to your referring physician.
  • If the test is abnormal or inconclusive, then additional tests may be ordered.
  • Information gained from this test helps your doctor make an accurate diagnosis and tailor a treatment plan that is best for you.

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Cardiac Catheterization (Coronary Angiogram)

A Cardiac Catheterization is a test that more accurate outlines the anatomy of the blood vessels that feed the heart, the coronary arteries. It also provides direct information about many vital functions and pressures of the heart. During cardiac catheterization, your doctor insert a long, thin, flexible tube, called a catheter, into the body. This catheter is guided through your blood vessels toward the heart. Dye will be injected to allow the doctor to take pictures of the blood flow in your heart and coronary arteries. This test is done for the following reasons:

  • To evaluate or confirm coronary heart disease (i.e. in patients with chest pain and/or abnormal stress test)
  • To determine if treatment (with balloon angioplasty, stenting, or bypass surgery) can help a patient with coronary heart disease
  • To evaluate how well blood is flowing through the coronary arteries after angioplasty or bypass surgery
  • During or after a heart attack, to evaluate the extent of coronary artery narrowing/blockage and direct the treatment plan.
  • To evaluate the cause of heart failure
  • To measure the pressures inside the heart. This may explain the cause symptoms, such as shortness of breath and chest pain, and direct treatment.
  • To determine if there is significant heart valve disease that might require surgery
  • To determine whether there is a congenital heart defect and evaluate how severe it is
Before the procedure:
  • You should plan to be at the hospital for the entire day. An overnight stay is occasionally required.
  • Wear or bring comfortable attire.
  • Do not eat for at least three hours before the test. Make your last meal light and without tea, coffee or soda.
  • Continue your currently heart medications unless specified otherwise.
  • Bring a list of your medications or the prescription bottles with you.
  • Avoid using body lotion on your chest the day of the test.
  • You will be asked to sign a consent form after the test has been explained to you and a focused discussion/exam is performed.
  • Several areas on your chest and shoulders will be cleansed with alcohol and stickers will be placed on your chest. Men may need to have areas of their chest shaved, to ensure that the stickers stay in place.
  • You will need to empty your bladder and wear only a hospital gown.
  • Tell the doctor or nurse if you are allergic to shellfish, iodine, x-ray dye or any medications.
  • An intravenous line (IV line) will be placed in the hand or arm.
  • You will be taken to the cardiac cath lab.
During the procedure:
  • You will be lying on a hard table, surrounded by x-ray equipment. The room is kept cool for the sensitive machines.
  • There will be stickers with wires on your chest to monitor your heart.
  • One or both of your groins will be shaved.
  • You may be given some medications to help you relax and become drowsy; you will not be put to sleep.
  • A local anesthetic (numbing medication) will be applied to your wrist or groin.
  • The doctor will insert a small tube under the skin and into the vessel much like an IV is started.
  • An x-ray dye is injected which may cause you to feel warm. Your doctor will communicate with you if he needs you to perform simple commands such as taking a breath or to cough.
  • Certain measurements that require medications may be used during the test. Some brief symptoms are normal during this portion.
  • Tell your doctor if you feel chest discomfort, nausea, or shortness of breath.
  • The length of the procedure varies, but is typically an hour. A longer procedure time does not necessarily indicate a problem.
  • Your heart rate and blood pressure are monitored closely.
After the procedure:
  • You may have a short catheter line left in your wrist or groin for several hours, or overnight. You must stay in bed and not bend the leg to prevent bleeding.
  • When the short catheter is removed (if the groin was used), a pressure device will be used to apply the pressure needed to keep the blood vessel from bleeding for approximately 30 minutes.
  • To prevent bleeding, you will have to spend several hours in bed.
  • The nurse will evaluate when you are ready to stand up and the doctor will decide when it's safe for you to go home.

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Percutanious Coronary Intervention (PCI)/Coronary Stenting/Angioplasty

A PCI/Angioplasty is a procedure used to restore adequate blood flow to the heart muscle by opening up the narrowed or blocked blood vessels with a tiny balloon. A stent may be expanded and left in the vessel to protect the flow of blood to inadequately supplied heart muscle. These vessels keep the heart muscle alive by delivering oxygen rich blood. Narrowing in these vessels usually occurs because of plaque formation, a disease known as coronary artery disease.


Before the procedure:
  • You should plan to be at the hospital for the entire day. An overnight stay is occasionally required.
  • Wear or bring comfortable attire.
  • Do not eat for at least three hours before the test. Make your last meal light and without tea, coffee or soda.
  • Continue your currently heart medications unless specified otherwise.
  • Bring a list of your medications or the prescription bottles with you.
  • Avoid using body lotion on your chest the day of the test.
  • You will be asked to sign a consent form after the test has been explained to you and a focused discussion/exam is performed.
  • Several areas on your chest and shoulders will be cleansed with alcohol and stickers will be placed on your chest. Men may need to have areas of their chest shaved, to ensure that the stickers stay in place.
  • You will need to empty your bladder and wear only a hospital gown.
  • Tell the doctor or nurse if you are allergic to shellfish, iodine, x-ray dye or any medications.
  • An intravenous line (IV line) will be placed in the hand or arm.
  • You will be taken to the cardiac cath lab.
During the procedure:
  • You will be lying on a hard table, surrounded by x-ray equipment. The room is kept cool for the sensitive machines.
  • There will be stickers with wires on your chest to monitor your heart.
  • One or both of your groins will be shaved.
  • You may be given some medications to help you relax and become drowsy; you will not be put to sleep.
  • A local anesthetic (numbing medication) will be applied to your wrist or groin.
  • The doctor will insert a small tube under the skin and into the vessel much like an IV is started.
  • An x-ray dye is injected which may cause you to feel warm. Your doctor will communicate with you if he needs you to perform simple commands such as taking a breath or to cough.
  • When widening the narrowed and diseased artery, the balloon will be inflated and deflated several times.
  • You may feel chest discomfort when the balloon is inflated. Tell the doctor if you feel any significant symptoms.
  • The length of the procedure varies, but is typically an hour. A longer procedure time does not necessarily indicate a problem.
  • Your heart rate and blood pressure will be monitored closely.
After the procedure:
  • You may spend the night in a Coronary Care Unit (CCU) or in an observation unit. Your nurse will monitor your heart rate, blood pressure, pulses, and catheter insertion site.
  • You may have a short catheter line left in your wrist or groin for several hours, or overnight. You must stay in bed and not bend the leg to prevent bleeding.
  • When the short catheter is removed (if the groin was used), a pressure device will be used to apply the pressure needed to keep the blood vessel from bleeding for approximately 30 minutes.
  • To prevent bleeding, you will have to spend several hours in bed.
  • The nurse will evaluate when you are ready to stand up and the doctor will decide when it's safe for you to go home. If additional observation is required, you may be transferred to a regular room.

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Cardioversion (Electrical Cardioversion)

A Cardioversion is a procedure aimed to restore your heart's electrical rhythm to normal. The healthy heart contains an intrinsic electrical rhythm and pathway that may be disrupted and disorganized. This can lead to symptoms and further deterioration of heart function. A cardioversion is performed to restart that normal rhythm. Your physician and nursing staff, in the hospital room, use gelled pads to channel an electric current through the chest and heart while you are in a state of sleep. Depending on the arrhythmia, successful cardioversion occurs in most individuals.


Before the procedure:
  • We advise you have someone drive you to the hospital and take you home. You will receive sedation.
  • Plan to stay at the hospital for approximately 4 hours
  • Do not eat after midnight before the procedure.
  • If you accidently eat, please notify the doctor, as your test may need to be rescheduled.
  • You will be asked to sign a consent form after the test has been explained to you.
  • An anesthesiologist will likely aid in the procedure.
  • Staff will enter your room with an equipment cart and monitor.
  • You will be connected to the monitor with pads placed on your chest and back.
  • An intravenous line (IV line) will be placed in your hand or arm for medicine to be given during the procedure.
During the procedure:
  • Oxygen will be given to you by face mask.
  • Some medications will be given through your IV line. You will briefly fall asleep and may not remember the procedure.
  • An electrical current is administered through the two pads placed on your chest and back. This impulse will likely restore your heart to a normal rhythm.
After the procedure:
  • You begin to wake but may feel drowsy and notice some redness on your chest.
  • The nurse will monitor your vital signs until you are fully awake.
  • You will be instructed when to take your medicines, eat, and get out of bed.
  • Depending upon your overall condition you may go home later the same day.

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